ClimApp

 

Title

 

Translating climate service into personalized adaptation strategies to cope with thermal climate stress

Lead PI Gao Chuansi, Lund University, Sweden

Partner PIs

  • Nybo Lars, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Toftum Jørn, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
  • Daanen Hein, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Funding agencies  FORMAS, IFD, NWO

Abstract

Thermal climate stress affects health and productivity for millions of European workers. Sudden changes in the thermal environment (heat waves or cold spells) are also major health challenges for the elderly and other vulnerable populations, increasing mortality and morbidity. The consequences of thermal stress are dependent not only on climate factors, but also on individual human physiology and thermoregulation capacity. For warning and preparation purposes, climate services can provide information on current and upcoming environmental conditions, but such weather forecasts will be much more valuable for individuals facing adverse weather conditions if combined with individual characteristics and translated into optimized adaptation strategies that can be provided and implemented immediately. Therefore, the present project is in accordance with topic A2 and A3 of this joint call dedicated to support the integration of climate service data with thermal physiology and feedback from end-users. Researchers and stakeholders from climate services and end-user organizations will collaborate with thermal physiologists, clothing and hydration experts, sociologists, and engineers. We will combine information from climate forecasts and weather warnings, with end-user data to develop a decision support system through an App. The ClimApp will provide timely relevant guidelines for individuals and public and private sector agencies to take actions to improve thermal resilience when adverse environmental conditions are expected. The effectiveness of the ClimApp will be assessed qualitatively and quantitatively both at individual user level and on European societal scale with involvement of large public and private stakeholders. Feedback will be utilized to improve the personalized climate service to maximize the impact and strengthen the integration of expertise from climatology and human physiology to optimize adaptation strategies for climate challenges.